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Deploy Kuma on Universal

To start learning how Kuma works, you run and secure a simple demo application that consists of two services:

  • demo-app: a web application that lets you increment a numeric counter. It listens on port 5000
  • redis: data store for the counter
 
---
title: service graph of the demo app
---
flowchart LR
demo-app(demo-app :5000)
redis(redis :6379)
demo-app --> redis
  

Prerequisites

Install Kuma

Install a Kuma control plane using the Docker images:

  • kuma-cp: at docker.io/kumahq/kuma-cp:preview
  • kuma-dp: at docker.io/kumahq/kuma-dp:preview
  • kumactl: at docker.io/kumahq/kumactl:preview

You can freely docker pull these images to start using Kuma, as we will demonstrate in the following steps.

Generate tokens

Create a token for Redis and a token for the app (both are valid for 30 days):

kumactl generate dataplane-token --tag kuma.io/service=redis --valid-for=720h > kuma-token-redis
kumactl generate dataplane-token --tag kuma.io/service=app --valid-for=720h > kuma-token-app

This requires authentication unless executed against a control-plane running on localhost. If kuma-cp is running inside a Docker container, see docker authentication docs .

Create a data plane proxy for each service

For Redis:

kuma-dp run \
  --cp-address=https://localhost:5678/ \
  --dns-enabled=false \
  --dataplane-token-file=kuma-token-redis \
  --dataplane="
  type: Dataplane
  mesh: default
  name: redis
  networking: 
    address: 127.0.0.1
    inbound: 
      - port: 16379
        servicePort: 26379
        serviceAddress: 127.0.0.1
        tags: 
          kuma.io/service: redis
          kuma.io/protocol: tcp
    admin:
      port: 9901"

For the demo app:

kuma-dp run \
  --cp-address=https://localhost:5678/ \
  --dns-enabled=false \
  --dataplane-token-file=kuma-token-app \
  --dataplane="
  type: Dataplane
  mesh: default
  name: app
  networking: 
    address: 127.0.0.1
    outbound:
      - port: 6379
        tags:
          kuma.io/service: redis
    inbound: 
      - port: 15000
        servicePort: 5000
        serviceAddress: 127.0.0.1
        tags: 
          kuma.io/service: app
          kuma.io/protocol: http
    admin:
      port: 9902"

Deploy the demo application

  1. Run redis as a daemon on port 26379 and set a default zone name:
      redis-server --port 26379 --daemonize yes
      redis-cli -p 26379 set zone local
    
  2. Install and start demo-app on the default port 5000:
      npm install --prefix=app/
      npm start --prefix=app/
    
  3. In a browser, go to 127.0.0.1:5000 and increment the counter.

Explore the GUI

You can view the sidecar proxies that are connected to the Kuma control plane:

Kuma ships with a read-only GUI that you can use to retrieve Kuma resources. By default the GUI listens on the API port and defaults to :5681/gui.

You can navigate to 127.0.0.1:5681/meshes/default/dataplanes to see the connected dataplanes.

Introduction to zero-trust security

By default, the network is insecure and not encrypted. We can change this with Kuma by enabling the Mutual TLS policy to provision a Certificate Authority (CA) that will automatically assign TLS certificates to our services (more specifically to the injected data plane proxies running alongside the services).

Before enabling Mutual TLS (mTLS) in your mesh, you need to create a MeshTrafficPermission policy that allows traffic between your applications.

If you enable mTLS without a MeshTrafficPermission policy, all traffic between your applications will be blocked.

  1. To create a MeshTrafficPermission policy that allows all traffic, do the following:
  echo 'type: MeshTrafficPermission 
  name: allow-all 
  mesh: default 
  spec: 
    targetRef: 
      kind: Mesh 
    from: 
      - targetRef: 
          kind: Mesh 
      default: 
        action: Allow' | kumactl apply -f -
  1. To create a Mesh policy with a builtin CA backend, do the following:
  echo 'type: Mesh
    name: default
    mtls:
      enabledBackend: ca-1
      backends:
      - name: ca-1
        type: builtin' | kumactl apply -f -

Once Mutual TLS has been enabled, Kuma will not allow traffic to flow freely across our services unless we explicitly have a Traffic Permission policy that describes what services can be consumed by other services. By default, a very permissive traffic permission is created.

For the sake of this demo, we will delete it:

kumactl delete traffic-permission allow-all-default

You can try to make requests to the demo application at 127.0.0.1:5000/ and you will notice that they will not work.

Now, let’s add back the default traffic permission:

echo 'type: MeshTrafficPermission
name: allow-all
mesh: default
spec:
  targetRef:
    kind: Mesh
  from:
  - targetRef:
      kind: Mesh
    default:
      action: Allow' | kumactl apply -f -

By doing so every request, we now make sure our demo application at 127.0.0.1:5000/ is not only working again, but it’s automatically encrypted and secure.

As usual, you can visualize the Mutual TLS configuration and the Traffic Permission policies we have just applied via the GUI, the HTTP API or kumactl.

Next steps

  • Explore the Features available to govern and orchestrate your service traffic.
  • Add a gateway to access the demo from the outside by following the builtin gateway guide.
  • Add Kong as gateway to access the demo from the outside by following the delegated gateway guide.
  • Federate zone into a multizone deployment.
  • Read the full documentation to learn about all the capabilities of Kuma.

  • Chat with us at the official Kuma Slack for questions or feedback.